Sunday thoughts: How will the DfE deal with teacher pay claims this Autumn?

  • The number of teachers leaving the profession increased by 12.4% compared to last year — and only 11% of those were retirees. [These figures, in fairness, are affected by Covid, with there being an element of legacy moves not taken during the pandemic now appearing in the data].
  • Teacher vacancies are at the highest level since records began in 2010 — with a 42% increase from last year’s data.
  • There has been a 14% rise in the number of job ads, compared to this time in the cycle before Covid.
  • ITT targets have been missed — again — by a lot — again. This graph, once more from the NfER, shows trainee teachers placed into schools by May, compared to DfE targets. We have 16% of physics teachers ready to train in English state schools compared to what it is predicted we need.
  • DfE evidence to the School Teacher Review Body (pp 19–23) shows that a high starting salary makes teaching competitive with other graduate professions, with private sector starting salaries at just over £30k both from High Fliers and ISE, and lower outside London (£27.5k in the South East, and £24k Yorkshire). Furtermore, DfE cite a series of academic papers that salaries matter for teacher recruitment.
  • Research from those hard-working wonks at NfER again shows that bursaries in ITT, as opposed to student loans, both increases the number of people entering ITT, and the composition of entrants.
  • Research from Sam Sims and colleagues at UCL shows that financial payments help with retention, albeit the study looked only at maths and science teachers, and only those 2 years in.
  • Quantum of an award
  • Distribution of an award
  • Sources of funding for an award

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